43Reblog
obliquecity:

dieuaidant:

The true Iranian Flag. Parcham-e Shiro Khorshid (Flag of the Lion and Sun). Has and always will be Iran’s real and ancient flag. 

“the lion and sun belongs to many visual and textual fields in Islamic and Iranian cultures. The enblem’s genealogy is variously narrated as pre-Islamic (through the sun’s meaning in Zoroastrianism) or as central Asian Turkic. There is a plethora of explanations that cannot be substantiated or are historically implausible. The least likely story is that the sun is the emblem of the Armenian defeat by the lion of Shiite Iran under the Safavid ruler Shah Abbas I (r. 1587-1629). More romantically, it is said that the lion and sun originated in a coin minted by a 13th century Saljuq ruler (of Anatolia) who expressed his love for his wife by representing her image. The lion and sun is also affiliated with the sign system of astrological tables, and it stands for Shiite loyalty to Ali through one of his given names, Asadallah, God’s Lion….Although the modern adoption of the lion and sun as a state emblem dated to the reign of Muhammad [Reza] Shah, some combinations of a lion and a sun was one of many Iranian state emblems as far back as the early Safavid period (1501-1722)….Similarly, Safavid and early Qajar flags were not marked exclusively by the lion and sun. As late as the 1830’s, flags with other figurative designs represented Iran. The best known flag was that oh Zul-faqar, which displayed the famous sword on a plain background. In 1835, when Fath’ali Shah’s grandson Rizaquli Mirza was asked to display the Iranian flag on their boat as they approached Malta, he drew a Zul-faqar on a plain cloth.” —- Afsaneh Najmabadi, “Women with Mustaches and Men Without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity”

obliquecity:

dieuaidant:

The true Iranian Flag. Parcham-e Shiro Khorshid (Flag of the Lion and Sun). Has and always will be Iran’s real and ancient flag. 

“the lion and sun belongs to many visual and textual fields in Islamic and Iranian cultures. The enblem’s genealogy is variously narrated as pre-Islamic (through the sun’s meaning in Zoroastrianism) or as central Asian Turkic. There is a plethora of explanations that cannot be substantiated or are historically implausible. The least likely story is that the sun is the emblem of the Armenian defeat by the lion of Shiite Iran under the Safavid ruler Shah Abbas I (r. 1587-1629). More romantically, it is said that the lion and sun originated in a coin minted by a 13th century Saljuq ruler (of Anatolia) who expressed his love for his wife by representing her image. The lion and sun is also affiliated with the sign system of astrological tables, and it stands for Shiite loyalty to Ali through one of his given names, Asadallah, God’s Lion….Although the modern adoption of the lion and sun as a state emblem dated to the reign of Muhammad [Reza] Shah, some combinations of a lion and a sun was one of many Iranian state emblems as far back as the early Safavid period (1501-1722)….Similarly, Safavid and early Qajar flags were not marked exclusively by the lion and sun. As late as the 1830’s, flags with other figurative designs represented Iran. The best known flag was that oh Zul-faqar, which displayed the famous sword on a plain background. In 1835, when Fath’ali Shah’s grandson Rizaquli Mirza was asked to display the Iranian flag on their boat as they approached Malta, he drew a Zul-faqar on a plain cloth.” —- Afsaneh Najmabadi, “Women with Mustaches and Men Without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity”

(Source: kourtneykumdashian)


where in the world?:

ask-iran:

Oh, there are quite a bit of languages spoken by my people! The ones I’ve shown here are just a part of my assortment of languages, with Farsi being the most widely spoken by a little more than half my population. All the languages spoken by my people are, of course, pleasant to the ear~

((I’m no linguist, so excuse me if I don’t have extensive information about Iran’s languages, since there is some discourse over the categorization of the languages spoken in Iran :’)

First off, yes, Persian or Farsi is what’s spoken by a majority of people in Iran, and itself has a variety of dialects and accents. The accent of a Persian speaking Isfahani is different than a Persian speaking Tehrani, which may be different than a Persian speaking Yazdi and so on. Persian has also been referred to as the ‘language of poetry’, and along with Farsi, Dari [spoken in Afghanistan], and Tajiki [spoken in Tajikistan] share similar traits as Persian.

Azeri is spoken most notably in the Ardabil province, and concentrated heavily in the city of Tabriz [located in another province near Ardabil]. Iranian Azeri may be different than what is spoken in Azerbaijan because Iranian Azeri has been influenced by Persian lexicon and other linguistic elements [and this is more apparent when discussions in Azeri turn more academic].

Kurdish is also spoken by Iranian Kurds [however, not all Kurds may identify as being ‘Iranian’ or ‘Syrian’ or ‘Iraqi’ Kurds, so be mindful] in Northern, Western, and Southern Iran and has a variety of dialects as well, as I’ve mentioned in the Kurdish panel.

Gilaki is a native language of Iran, spoken by the Gilaki people mostly concentrated in the Gilan province, and is considered to be similar to Mazandarani, a language spoken in the Mazandaran province.

Arabic is prevalent among Iranian Arabs living in Khuzestan and even further south near the Hormozgan province. Arabic is also taught in schools as the language of the Quran, though native Arabic speakers in Iran have their own dialect(s).

Balochi is spoken by the Balochi people, and Balochis exist in Iran, Pakistan, and even in Oman. They live in the area of what is now known as Balochi-Sistan, thought to Balochis, this is just referred to as Balochistan [and again, be mindful of Balochis’ identification, they have a distinct cultural identity and may not always adhere to nationalist labels like “Iranian” or “Pakistani” or “Omani”].

Other languages not listed: Bakhtiari [a native language of the nomadic Bakhtiari people, in the same language family as Persian], Lori [the language of the Lori people, also in the same language family as Persian], Mazandarani [mentioned above as the language of Mazandarani people, similar to Gilaki], Turkmeni [spoken by Turkomen], Qashqai [spoken by the nomadic Qashqai people of Iran], there are even small pockets of people speaking Pashto, Hindi, and Somali as well!))

(via fyeahiran)


where in the world?: #iran #persian #persia #irooni #parsi #farsi #azeri #kurdish #kordi #gilaki #arabic #balochi

13Reblog

where in the world?: #armenia #armenistan #armenian #monastery #armenian monestary

1Reblog

where in the world?: #turkey #türkiye #islam #islamic architecture

9Reblog

where in the world?: #hafez #hafez tomb #tomb of hafez #persian #iranian #hafiz #shiraz #poetry #pars #parsi #iran #irooni

5Reblog
"Praying for those who love you, that’s sincerity. Praying for those who hurt you, that’s maturity."
where in the world?: #prayer #religion #life quotes

15Reblog

where in the world?: #Indoor #Kolahstudio #a1one #arabic #farsi #graffiti #handstyle #iran graffiti #iran streetart #iranian #kolahstudio.com #letter #pain-things.com #persian #tehran graffiti #tehran streetart #استودیو #ایران #تنها #تهران #شهری #هنر #کلاه #کلاه استودیو #گرافیتی #eshgh

1Reblog
Tomb of Cyrus the Great
PersepolisShiraz, Iran

Tomb of Cyrus the Great

Persepolis
Shiraz, Iran


where in the world?: #cyrus the great #cyrus #persian king #persepolis #tomb of cyrus the great #pars #parsi #farsi #persian farsi #persian empire #ancient persia

53Reblog
Naghshe Jahan
Esfahan, Iran

Naghshe Jahan

Esfahan, Iran


where in the world?: #Naghshe Jahan #Esfahan #Iran #Persia #Persian #Ancient Persia #Persepolis #Pars #Parsi #Farsi #Isfahan #Esfahan Iran #Naghshe #Jahan

58Reblog
Yazd, Iran

Yazd, Iran


where in the world?: #ancient mosque #masjid #mosque #yazd #iran #iranian #persian #parsi #persian farsi #pars #architecture #architectural design #ancient #persia #farsi

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